{ why church planting? }

 

Establishing strong new churches is one of the best ways to reach people with the gospel, increase the number of believers in a region, and renew the whole body of Christ

REACH

DISCIPLE

INFLUENCE

Church planting is uniquely effective at reaching the lost, discipling the found, and influencing the culture.

Studies show that the average new church gains most of it's members (30-60%) from the ranks of people who aren't attending any church, whereas churches over 10-15 years old tend to gain 80-90% of new members by transfer from other congregations. These statistics show that new churches are uniquely effective at reaching and discipling new generations and new residents.

Church planting is uniquely effective at reaching the lost, discipling the found, and influencing the culture.

THE GREAT COMMISSION

Most of the evangelistic movements in the New Testament are part of church-planting movements—not simply attempts to share the faith.

How did the Apostles interpret and obey the Great Commission? Answer: they planted churches. Most of the evangelistic movements in the New Testament are part of church-planting movements—not simply attempts to share the faith. The Apostle Paul, perhaps the grated missionary ever, employed a two-part strategy throughout his work: first, he preached the gospel in various settings in city centers (e.g. Acts 16:9-12); second, he planted church-planting churches (e.g. Titus 1:5).

Most of the evangelistic movements in the New Testament are part of church-planting movements—not simply attempts to share the faith.

KINGDOM FOCUS

It develops kingdom mindfulness.

Studies show church planting helps an existing congregation the most when, like Cornerstone, the new congregation is voluntarily "birthed" by an older "mother" church. The excitement, new leaders, new ministries, and expanded reach of the daughter church strengthen and renew the mother church in various ways. Planting daughter churches also helps people focus, not on one's own institutional "turf," but on the overall advancement of the kingdom of God in a given city.

It develops kingdom mindfulness.

RENEWAL

It renews the whole body of Christ.

It renews the whole body of Christ.

SOURCE: CENTER CHURCH

Church planting revitalizes older 

churches in the vicinity and helps

renew the whole body of Christ. Why? 

First,  new churches have the freedom 

to innovate, serving as "research and 

development" hubs, thereby bringing 

new ideas to the  Christians and churches in the city. Second, the 

fruitfulness of new churches can challenge older churches to self-examination as they clarify their own vision, specialties, and identities. Third,

the leadership dynamics of new

churches tend to surface creative, strong leaders who are further 

developed and deployed for the gospel.

 

Little Rock's culture is a stew of an increasingly post-Christian worldview combined with a deeply moralistic understanding of the gospel.

{ why Little Rock? }

Little Rock's culture is a stew of an increasingly post-Christian worldview combined with a deeply moralistic understanding of the gospel.

This uneasy blend drives many younger generations either to sacrifice elements of the gospel for cultural acceptance or to leave church altogether because they can't see the point.

IT'S

GROWING

Pulaski County, where Little Rock is the largest city, is growing at about 1,400 people per year.

More than half that annual growth is in Little Rock. To keep pace, Little Rock needs roughly a new 700-member church every two years. Studies show that the faith itself is in decline in cities with a declining church-to-population ratio.

Pulaski County, where Little Rock is the largest city, is growing at about 1,400 people per year.

IT'S

CHANGING

Like most other city centers, Little Rock is increasingly post-Christian.

The shift is seen in most measurable categories: fewer people say their faith is important to them, fewer people are attending churches, fewer people are studying the scriptures, etc.

Like most other city centers, Little Rock is increasingly post-Christian.

IT'S

STRUGGLING

Little Rock is a city encumbered with cultural Christianity.

Though 90% of people in Little Rock self-identify as Christians, only 51% claim to attend church regularly, 56% either don't read the Scriptures or doubt their accuracy, and 46% of self-identified Christians believe they must earn their salvation. These statistics show that while identifying as a Christian is still socially useful in Little Rock, the ancient truths of 

classic Christianity have been 

consciously or unconsciously swapped for a counterfeit.

Little Rock is a city encumbered with cultural Christianity.

SOURCES: PEW FORUM; BARNA; US CENSUS DATA; CENTER CHURCH

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